Tag Archives: Thursday doors

Thursday Doors: Tokyo National Museum

So, I have come to my last doors from the trip to Asia. We spent our last few days in Tokyo, and I took a break from doors while we walked around the palace, went to Robot Restaurant and Tokyo Disney, and then we got to the National Museum.

Tokyo1

Doors here are ornate and orderly.

Tokyo2

These were the last interesting doors we saw before getting on the plane back to the States!

Tokyo4

This post is for Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. 

It is the last in a series from my trip to Asia in the summer of 2017. Other posts from the same trip can be found here:

Seoul Walk

Downtown Seoul

Changdeokgung Palace

Hutong

Beijing City Wall

Palace Museum in the Forbidden City

Chinese Coke

Great Wall Shopping

Shanghai, Xintiandi

Shanghai, the Bund

Zhujiajiao, water town, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

Lamps

 

 

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Thursday Doors: Zhujiajiao Part 3, Human Activity

This is the third installment of the doors of ancient water town of Zhujiajiao, near Shanghai. I grouped the pictures into three different blog posts. Part 1 showed doors right on the water.  Part 2 focuses on doors of different colors. Today I will show either actual humans or evidence of recent human activity.

Even in the rain, Zhujiajiao is busy and somewhat crowded. None of these storefronts is large and they are all on top of each other. Sometimes you need a clue where to go.

01Zhujiajiao
Follow the arrow to lunch

Follow the lanterns and go upstairs.

The lions are pretty common but not ubiquitous. Sometimes it just seems like you need *some*thing on each side of the door in China.

 

Then there are the bikes and motorcycles, if you don’t have a boat.

The singer just outside the door.

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Or how about a caged bird? (The dog doesn’t care. He’s seen it all!)

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Lots of firewood (and plants).

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And an odd sculpture in front of a gallery. What is that sculpture supposed to be, anyway? A heart? Lips? A little red person with an abnormally big butt?

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And finally, how many people will understand the irony of what is written on this door handle?

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Thursday doors is a weekly feature in which door lovers share their pictures from doors all around the world. Stop by Norm 2.0’s blog to say hello and see some of the others.

Thursday Doors: Zhujiajiao, Part 2, colors

The ancient water town of Zhujiajiao really has a lot of doors! I grouped them into three different blog posts to try to give them some structure. Part 1 showed doors right on the water.  In Part 2, here, I planned to focus on doors of different colors. China in general and Shanghai in particular was a brightly colored place.

But once I had organized the pictures, I discovered a lot of brown. That was the color of the majority of doors in Zhujiajiao, and you can see that clearly even in part 1. The trim would sometimes be bright red, or more occasionally blue. But most of them were a rich, reddish brown color. So I grouped the brownest ones together here, and what might stand out more are the differences in shape and trim. Some doors certainly look a lot more welcoming than others.

And then there were the occasional different ones. Red. Blue. Teal. Gray. Aqua. (But even these tended to be juxtaposed with brown).

14ZhujiajiaoRed17ZhujiajiaoBlue22ZhujiajiaoTeal26ZhujiajiaoGray27ZhujiajiaoAqua

Why so few red doors? Feng Shui may provide an answer. According to one article I read, red is the color of the South, and of the fire element. Building codes in ancient China stipulated that only high-ranking government officials could paint their doors red, which is one reason why red is associated with prosperity.

Whereas blue is associated with water, and with relaxation. And brown doors are associated with wood and earth elements, and with stability. Based on my very unscientific sampling, stability seems to be highly valued in Zhujiajiao!

Thursday doors is a weekly feature in which door lovers share their pictures from doors all around the world. Stop by Norm 2.0’s blog to say hello and see some of the others.

 

Thursday Doors: Zhujiajiao (part 1): water town

Zhujiajiao is a water town near Shanghai. It is located in Qingpu District, south of the Yangtze River. It is also called “The Venice of Shanghai” and features over 10,000 buildings dating back to the Ming and Qing dynasties.

Many of those buildings have doors, making this town a perfect subject for the Thursday Doors photo challenge! I’ve divided my blogs about Zhujiajiao into 3 parts because I had so many pictures they all started to run together.

Part one is about doors right on or next to water. After getting out of the van from Shanghai, tourists walk down the sidewalks next to the canals into town. Boat operators offer canal rides.

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Many doors lead right onto the water.

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Some of the dining establishments have stairs leading from the canal where you can dock your boat.

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Others have canalside dining, either right next to the water, or on a balcony.

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It was cloudy and sometimes a bit rainy, but not cold. This view shows one of the Venetian-like bridges.

Venice of Shanghai

Thursday doors is a weekly feature in which door lovers share their pictures from doors all around the world. Stop by Norm 2.0’s blog to say hello and see some of the others.

 

Thursday Doors: The Bund, Shanghai

This week for Thursday Doors, am continuing my series of door posts from my trip to Asia last summer. Last time I posted pictures of our tour of Xintiandi, a hip shopping tourist district in Shanghai.

Bund01

The Bund, on the Western Bank of Huangpu River, is the next stop on the tour. “Bund” means an embankment or quay. The buildings of the Bund are height restricted and built to look European. (There is even a clock tower that chimes like Big Ben in London!) They stand in contrast with the buildings on the opposite bank of the river, which boasts the modern skyscrapers of Lujazui in the Pudong District. Pudong is the location of the Shanghai Tower, as of this writing the world’s 2nd tallest building with the highest observation deck.

As I mentioned in the previous post about Xintiandi, we didn’t have great weather the day we were in Shanghai. Clouds can be seen below in the panoramic picture, and rain on the ground in front of the doors. These doors open into sober establishments like department stores, hotels, or banks. Many of them are labeled (so you can tell them apart?)

I took all of these pictures from the window of a moving tour bus, so the angles can get a little creative, but at least I stayed dry!

Even though there are no doors in these other pictures, I’m including them anyway, because no post about the Bund would be complete without a View from the Top of Shanghai Tower. The clouds add mystery to this view from above. The tower practically has its own weather:

TopofShanghaiTower

And a view of the Eastern Bank, taken from an evening river cruise.

PudongSkyscrapers

The Bund is a study in contrasts: the old and the new, the traditional and the modern, the two faces of Shanghai.

BundPanorama

Thursday doors is a weekly feature in which door lovers share their pictures from doors all around the world. Stop by Norm 2.0’s blog to say hello and see some of the others.

Thursday Doors: Xintiandi, Shanghai

Last summer I took my first trip to Asia with my family. Our itinerary was as follows: South Korea (Seoul), China (Beijing, Xi’an, Hong Kong, Shanghai), and finally Japan (Tokyo). I find travel blogging to be challenging without some guiding or organizing principle to follow, so I have been blogging about this trip periodically and showing pictures from it in my weekly photo challenge blogs, especially Thursday Doors. I don’t have any new doors this week, so I’m continuing with the trip. Continue reading Thursday Doors: Xintiandi, Shanghai

Thursday Doors: El Camino Real, Mountain View

El Camino Real is 600 miles long, linking cities up and down California. Sometimes known as the “Royal Road” or the “King’s Highway,” it has a storied history: between 1683 and 1834, Jesuit and Franciscan missionaries established a series of missions from today’s Baja California and Baja California Sur into what is now the state of California. Today’s El Camino links those 21 missions.

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In present-day Mountain View, however, El Camino a busy road with a lot of cars. I’ve done some Thursday doors posts about Mountain View before, highlighting it’s history as the geeky ground zero of Silicon Valley: Self-driving car, NASA Ames, HP Garage, Steve Jobs’ house, Stanford Medical Center. This post shows another side of the city.

Last weekend when I was at a friend’s house to play some string quartets, I drove my car into a curb. The tire didn’t go flat, but the rubber was damaged and it looked like there was a bite taken out of it. I could see some nylon. Another friend recommended a tire place on El Camino, and I took my car there this morning to find out that yes, the tire needed to be replaced. It would take about an hour and a half, during which I wanted to meet a group of geocachers for lunch at Panera Bread, a little over a mile away. I left my car there and walked.

“Caminar” is the Spanish verb for “to walk,” and as I walked down this camino I had a very different view of what I passed than I did when I drive every day.

First I passed this motel. Not sure I would want to stay there, but I probably would if the price was right.

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Budget Motel

This looked like someone’s house. The door was set back from the street and protected by bars and a gate.

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Private Home

One of several medical offices and dialysis centers.

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Medical Office

An old-fashioned hardware store where you can find a lot of good stuff.

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True Value Hardware

Supposedly a personal trainer works here, but the building and parking lot are empty.

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Abandoned Personal Trainer office

Never been in here, or seen this before:

06Vape
Vaping
07Vape
More Vaping

A restaurant that delivers

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Restaurant

Buy a new vacuum cleaner or get your old one fixed!

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Vacuum cleaner purchase and repair

Sit on that weird bench while waiting for your car to be done?

10ForeignAuto
Foreign Car Service

Upscale apartment complex

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Guest Parking Only

Even more upscale. We lived in a place similar to this one the first month we were in CA while we waited for our furniture. The balconies are either mind-numbingly or comfortingly similar.

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Balcony Doors

The pool is visible from the street but no one is swimming today. Probably it’s too cold.

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Pool: Keep Closed

Painting a teddy bear blue makes me think of getting my hair cut, how about you?

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Kids Hair Cuts!

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by adding your post to the link over at Norm 2.0’s blog!

Thursday Doors: Fantastic Beasts Found in Redwood City

These doors aren’t the usual fare that you can open and walk through, but they are still doors.

I started teaching at a new school last week, in Redwood City. Afterwards I went to find a geocache in a park nearby, Stulsaft Park. On the map the cache looked close to the road, but it turned out I had to meander quite a lot through past a playground and through some back trails before I got to the cache zone. On the way, I found a few painted boxes. There were pretty nature scenes painted on their doors:

It turns out that these in the park were not the only painted box doors in this city. There’s also this little lady:

CreatureRWC

And the Dragon Theater, a community theater specializing in contemporary plays for adults.

DragonTheater
Exciting, courageous, and rare!

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by adding your post to the link over at Norm 2.0’s blog!

Thursday Doors: Roadkill

I’ll be the first to admit this isn’t a particularly pretty door. But it also doesn’t deserve this fate!

DoorWithTires

We found this stuff by the side of the road while looking for a geocache. This area needs some CITO (Cache In, Trash Out) but we weren’t equipped to carry the stuff away. (And we did find the cache. It was in the field behind the fence, hidden in a thicket of trees).

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by adding your post to the link over at Norm 2.0’s blog!

Thursday Doors: Little Italy San Jose

2017 wasn’t a bad year for me. Things got progressively better as it went on and I look back fondly on many personal and family events of the year.

But as the 1-year anniversary of the Women’s March approached this January, I was reminded how demoralized I had been when last year began. My novel languished, and my blog became very pictorial, as I blogged about what I thought were safe topics. The feeling of my country and our democracy having been attacked and undermined both from within and from without, was chilling. The sparse inauguration crowds and the lies told about them on the world stage added to the cold wintery feelings of alienation.

earthsignBut what a difference a year makes! Last year, as millions marched all over the world, I caught up with an old friend in Santa Cruz. I have to admit that as an introvert, protests, marching, and the like don’t come naturally to me. (I appreciated the sign that read “So bad, even introverts are here!”) I didn’t wear a pink hat, but I enjoyed reading the signs and being surrounded by a group of people who were peaceful but happy and energized, and who cared. That march was the beginning of a long thaw for me. I talked about it in church, and wrote about it here: Wild and Precious.

So this year, when the church was getting together a group of people to march again, I joined in enthusiastically. We went to the San Jose march, which started near City Hall and ended near Little Italy, where I took the photos for this post.

I hadn’t known San Jose had a Little Italy, and it appears to be a relatively new development. Visit their website here, to read about the businesses, the piazza, and plans for a museum and cultural center. The gateway arch pictured here was dedicated in April 2015.

LittleItaly

Here are some of the doors. The last one warns you that you are in Sharks territory!

GreenDoorGreenYellowDoorGreenRedDoorSharksTerritory

PussyCatHatAnd this year, I did wear a hat. It was a gift from a friend, who knitted it by hand and added a silver kitty charm to the brim. I feel blessed to have friends like that!

 

 

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by adding your post to the link over at Norm 2.0’s blog!