Tag Archives: Thursday doors

Thursday Doors: Chickens and More

DonkeyI am still doing my geocaching streak, and today’s find, called Donkey Cache, took me to an interesting area that I never knew existed in the Barron Park neighborhood of Palo Alto. To get to the cache, I had to walk through Cornelis Bol park, which is named for a Stanford professor who owned donkeys and lived in the area in the mid-20th century.

Shed

On my way back to my car, I got a little sidetracked and found myself near a shed. I said to myself, “I wonder if there’s a Thursday door around here somewhere that I can photograph.” Indeed there was.

This was a funny little area with buildings that I didn’t understand at first.

FoodandDoor

If you look closely, you can see a chicken in the background, through the door to his coop. A couple of these doors seem to go nowhere in particular.

Gate

They certainly aren’t keeping the chickens out (or in).

Chicken

A little farther along the road there was another structure, with the door closed and chicken statues in front:

Coop

What I am struck most by in these photographs is the drab weather. It’s neither raining nor sunny. Not what you think of when you say “California,” or “January.”

It’s also quite remarkable that this land is still so free and undeveloped, here in the Bay Area where housing is at a premium and prices have reached extreme levels. Cornelis Bol appears to have wanted it that way.

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time) at Norm 2.0’s blog here.

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Thursday Doors: Tallac Historic Site

Usually when people think about Lake Tahoe they think skiing. And that was true for us too this year around Christmas time. But on the way home we wanted to find some geocaches in the area, and that took us to some other places that skiers might not know about. For this week’s Thursday doors, I am showing my pictures from one such place, the Tallac Historic Site.

Cabin

A century ago the Tallac Historic Site was a resort and retreat for wealthy families on the shores of Lake Tahoe. Now, during the summer, it is a museum. The buildings are closed during the winter, but it is still a snowshoeing and hiking destination, and you can walk around and see all the aqua-colored doors.

Baldwin

These buildings are nestled among some really tall trees on the shores of the lake. To me they seem rustic rather than luxurious. But the scenery is spectacular.

TallTrees

This was the best-looking door:

AquaDoor

Whereas this Washoe structure didn’t have a door at all:

Doorway

Not much snow yet this year.

And this sign, matter-of-factly placed on one of the interpretive bulletin boards, was a little scary. Plague!

Plague

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time) at Norm 2.0’s blog here.

Saturday Doors: Henry C Hall House

My doors for this week are also from the archives. I visited Boston this past summer and caught up with an old friend. She was my orchestra stand partner, to be precise. We often rehearsed together at her house on Mystic Street, near the Mystic River in Arlington MA. We were stand partners in crime through symphonies, requiems, concertos, masses, and medleys. We also played chamber music together at the Belmont Farmers’ Market. That all changed a little over 2 years ago when she got divorced and moved out of the house on Mystic Street, and I moved to California.  Continue reading Saturday Doors: Henry C Hall House

Buying a Cello

TopOfStairsWhen you are buying a new instrument, whether for yourself or someone else, it feels like opening (and closing) many doors. The last time I went instrument shopping, it was for myself. In the past 10 years, I have bought both a violin and a viola. As an adult, I found that experience fun.

But I remember the experience as a teen being stressful. I played several instruments and tried to think about tone, sound, playability, etc, but the looming questions in the back of my mind were always things like, would my teachers like it? Would my parents complain about the price? Was this instrument “worth it?” I had a hard time focusing on what was important. Continue reading Buying a Cello

Thursday Doors: Palace Museum in the Forbidden City

Earlier this summer I was gone for 3 weeks on a trip to Asia. Our itinerary was as follows: South Korea (Seoul), China (Beijing, Xi’an, Hong Kong, Shanghai), and finally Japan (Tokyo). I find travel blogging to be rather challenging without some guiding or organizing principle to follow, so I have been blogging about this trip and showing pictures from it in my weekly photo challenge blogs, Mundane Monday and Thursday Doors. Not everything is mundane and not everything is a door, but these two concepts are still covering a lot of ground. Continue reading Thursday Doors: Palace Museum in the Forbidden City

Thursday Doors: Downtown Seoul

Many buildings in Seoul are big, and serious. And the doors themselves are nothing special but there is a lot around them. An example of this is the War Memorial of Korea, commemorating the Korean War and those who died fighting it. A long stone staircase leads up to a wide mouth of windows.

Doorway to the War Memorial of Korea

In downtown Seoul there are other examples, including the Metropolitan Library

And the Seoul City Hall in Seoul Plaza.

Gyeongbokgung Palace, next to Gwanghwamun Square, is more urban than Changdeokgung, which I blogged about last week. It stands close to other places of business in the city. On our last day, we walked past the library and City Hall and across Gwanghwamun Square to get to this palace.

Gwanghwamun

Some doors of Gyeongbokgung:

Even in the middle of the city, there was a part of the palace that was an oasis from the rest.

Panorama.jpg

This post is for Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. I’ll be sharing doors from my recent trip to East Asia for the next several Thursdays.