Award Top

Trophy

It’s that time of year again, for graduations and award ceremonies. These are generally happy occasions, but I personally find the experience a bit mixed. You see, I am not an award winner, not the one up on stage giving a speech. I am introverted, and, truth be told, not that accomplished.

More than that, though, I can’t go to an awards ceremony without hearing about the awardee’s positive attitude, the smile on the face, the spring in the step, the can-do spirit. The awardee is invariably “more” than their grades, or their work achievements, or their sports skills, and that something extra is what “really” earned them the award. It is not, we are told, the specific accomplishment that award has engraved on it or sculpted into it—not even they are handed a tiny golden man with an even tinier ball stuck to his foot.

This is all well and good–I mean, I wouldn’t want to go back to the bad old days when the only award given out went to the worst insufferable know-it-all in the class. I like that there are more awardees these days, recognizing a diversity of contributors and achievements.

But I still can’t help wondering about the other kids, the other non-award-winners. The ones who, despite a modicum of achievement, can’t summon a positive attitude; the ones whose support systems are fraying, whose grip on mental or physical health may be precarious, or who just aren’t that into it, but who still put in the effort, come to school every day, and do the work. It’s damn hard to excel at something you dislike. But these kids do it.

I think most well-meaning adults would argue that attitude is a “choice” and if you’re not feeling it, you should just fake it until you make it. After all, it’s true that you don’t have to feel like doing something in order to get it done. And from an adult’s point of view, it’s certainly a lot easier to like and bestow favors upon a smiling kid than one who is angry, frustrated or withdrawn.

But faking it emotionally comes at a cost. Student stress, anxiety, and depression have reached alarming levels, even among those who appear to be comfortable, safe, and financially solvent. Students talk about the burden of “effortless perfection” that they feel is expected of them, especially at so-called top schools.

There are no easy answers to this dilemma. Students make these expectations of each other, and of themselves too. But I think that adults contribute to the problem when we make recognition all about the smile. I’d like to see, maybe just once during a 90-minute ceremony, a kid getting an award for completing something difficult and unpleasant, for dragging themselves out of bed and facing the inner demons for the 90th time that year, and not having fun doing it.

Trophy

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4 thoughts on “Trophy”

  1. As someone who occasionally received awards because I was good at something, I used to wonder if I was really good at it or if I was just getting an award because I was disabled and not sitting home feeling sorry for myself. Was I being recognized just for showing up, or because I really had talent? Even now, when people tell me I am “inspirational” for my accomplishments, I wonder if it’s just because I’m doing it from a wheelchair.

    Creating a feeling of self-worth is challenging for all of us. And everyone is fighting some type of battle just to show up.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So true, Karen. We leave a lot of kids behind by overemphasizing achievements of others. I’m not suggesting we don’t celebrate excellence, but it’s a hard road for those who may find excellence unattainable. My friend says sometimes he just likes to get out of the shower and say, “ta-da” as if he just pulled a rabbit out of a hat, cause some days are just that hard and sometimes you need a boost for just doing the daily slog.😍

    Liked by 1 person

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